Tag Archives: Sara Mulvanny

The Star-Spun Web Makes its Debut

Last month, I was privileged to have Scott Evans (@MrEPrimary) unveil the cover of my new book, The Star-Spun Web. Just in case you missed it, here it is again:

The Star-Spun Web Front Cover

Front cover of The Star-Spun Web, art by Sara Mulvanny, designed by Sophie Bransby, published by Stripes Books February 2019.

I love everything about it – the movement, the web itself, the stars, the planes, the boy and girl, the building in the top right corner (the Home in which Tess, the main girl character, has grown up), and particularly the spider in the bottom left corner. This is Violet, Tess’s pet tarantula, who has been with her since she was a very little girl. Tarantulas aren’t the commonest pets in books, it’s true – and certainly, they wouldn’t make the sort of pet I’d like to have myself – but, for whatever reason, when the character of Violet came into my head she was a tarantula, and so a tarantula she’s stayed. Despite being rather arachnophobic myself, I love everything about Violet, and in the story she’s a cute and lovable (and very important) companion to Tess – and importantly, she doesn’t do anything remotely frightening. There’s no biting, for instance, nor any pouncing, or anything of that ilk. So, if you were hesitant about reading this book when it comes out – in February 2019, which is really getting rather close now – please don’t let the idea of Violet put you off. She’s a darling, I promise.

The artist who created this cover is Sara Mulvanny, whose amazing work also adorned the cover of The Eye of the North; I was lucky enough to have the same cover designer too, Sophie Bransby of Stripes Books. I think they’re a dream team!

The Star-Spun Web is a science-tinged tale about a girl who must embrace her own frightening power and face the horror of war to save everyone she loves – and the universe itself. It’s a very different story to The Eye of the North, but it has some things in common: clever, brave and determined children, scheming adults, and seemingly overwhelming odds, for a start. It’s been getting some good reviews from its early readers…

“There are cliff hangers and nail biting moments and moments of wondrous joy! I couldn’t put it down and was disappointed to finish. I wanted more… and I am hopeful that more may be on the cards? This is one to read and share and pass on to friends, young and old.”  – Review by Erin F., Librarian, on NetGalley

I’m really looking forward to The Star-Spun Web being out in the world, and I hope you’ll enjoy it. While it’s not a story which has lived in my head all my life, as The Eye of the North was, it’s one which has come to mean a lot to me over the past year, and it’s a story about (among other things) family and what it means to be part of one, the cost and motivation of war, and the wonder – as well as the danger – of scientific experimentation. It will be published in the UK and Ireland by Stripes Books on February 7th, 2019, and you can preorder it, and find out more about the book, here if you like. Preorders are really appreciated by authors and publishers alike, and I’m grateful for each one!

While I’m here: I was also proud to see The Eye of the North named by Sarah Webb as one of her top 50 children’s books of the year. It was a wonderful surprise, and a great way to finish out this crazy, busy, and brilliant year.

Thank you to everyone who’s read, reviewed, enjoyed and spread the word about me and my books over the past year – it’s been a magical, unforgettable time. I hope 2019 will bring lots more of the same!

The Eye of the North Comes Home

Earlier today, I was sent a photo via email. It was from my mother-in-law, who happened to be passing a bookshop window at just the right moment, and snapped this shot.

The Eye of the North in Hodges Figgis window

When I received it, my heart leapt. This bookshop is Hodges Figgis, Ireland’s oldest (I believe), and certainly a place in which I have whiled away many happy hours over the past twenty years. It is always my first port of call when I’m in ‘town’ (as anyone who has ever lived in any part of Dublin invariably refers to the city centre) and while Dublin is, thankfully, full of bookshops, and I am not a stranger to any of them, there’s something special about Hodges Figgis. We have history. We go back.

So to see my book – my book, with its fabulous, Sara Mulvanny cover – sitting in Hodges Figgis window… well. That was an experience.

Last August, when my book was published in North America, I felt proud too. This, however, feels different. This feels personal, like the book is coming home. This feels like a circle has been closed, like the ‘me’ of twenty years ago – for whom a day like this was a distant, barely-dreamed dream – could walk into Hodges Figgis and see a beautiful foil-edged handful of a book, a book like mine, and pick it up. My book is going to be on the shelves of the bookshops of the city I called home for so many years, where I did all my growing up, where I lived and loved and lost and laughed, and that makes my heart ache with something like nostalgia and pride and pure, bright happiness all mixed in together.

I don’t know how to feel. It’s strange, this publishing a book lark. You’d think it would feel a lot less complicated than it does.

I spoke to a friend a few weeks ago, when my confidence was at a low ebb. He told me: ‘Tolkien, when he published The Lord of the Rings, said ‘What have I done? I’ve given them my heart to shoot at.” I don’t think I’ve ever heard it put quite so well as that. Publishing a book – particularly a first book, the book you’ve had in you for years and into which you’ve poured every bit of yourself – is exactly like placing a target over your most vulnerable self and inviting people to take aim. But somehow knowing Tolkien felt the same way makes it seem much better, even though it doesn’t lessen the sense of panic and anxiety that are always there, like a counterpoint, below the happiness and relief. Perhaps the panic and anxiety are heightened when your book comes home, when it lands on turf you know, when shops you’ve walked through in search of a perfect dream become repositories for your own story. You begin to imagine other seekers, people just like you, for whom your book might be their perfect dream – and that brings a weight, as well as a lightness.

I didn’t know any of this when I began to write. Would I have continued, if I had? Yes. Absolutely. Despite everything, this journey has been perfect, and has all happened just as it was supposed to.

So. Once more, to you – the faithful reader who has been here through it all – thank you. The road has been smoother because of your company. It’s not an easy thing, this realising of dreams, but everything is easier with friends by your side. Thank you for being part of my dream, and for cheering The Eye of the North home.

EOTN_UK_FrontCover

THE EYE OF THE NORTH front cover, UK edition (Stripes Publishing, 2018), artist Sara Mulvanny, designer Sophie Bransby

Cover Reveal for THE EYE OF THE NORTH (UK edition)!

This morning, my wi-fi stopped working just before 8 am. That was unfortunate, because a very wonderful book blogger named Jo Clarke was preparing to unveil the UK cover for my book, THE EYE OF THE NORTH, right at that time.

It was one of those moments where you just have to shake your head and laugh at the absurdity of the universe.

In any case, shortly after 8 my internet came back and I was able to do what I’m urging you to do now, which is visit this lovely post on Jo’s blog and read what she had to say about my book, and her very kind words about the beautiful cover image. I’m extremely grateful to Jo, and to my publishers (Stripes Publishing), for giving me the joyful experience of a good old-fashioned cover reveal – it was so much fun, and I’m so thankful to all those who took the time to share, comment on and show their appreciation for the beautiful art which has been created for the UK publication of THE EYE OF THE NORTH.

And, because I can’t resist, I’m going to share the stupendous cover image myself. It was designed by Sophie Bransby at Stripes and drawn by Sara Mulvanny, and here it is:

EOTN_UK_FrontCover

THE EYE OF THE NORTH front cover, UK edition (Stripes Publishing, 2018), artist Sara Mulvanny, designer Sophie Bransby

So. Now you know what to look for when shopping for excellent books on or after February 8th, 2018. What do you think of the cover art? Let me know!